OCALI NOW | Issue 32 • October 2021

OCALICONLINE 2021 15 years logo

What We’re Excited About: OCALICONLINE 2021

We’re just weeks away from hosting OCALICONLINE 2021. And while every year is special, this year, we celebrate 15 years as a catalyst of moving inspiration into action.

With less than a month to go, we couldn’t be more excited to welcome you and others from around the globe as we connect virtually. Over 1,500 of your peers and colleagues have already signed up – from 42 states, Australia, Canada, France, Namibia, South Korea, and the United Kingdom. For those who are already registered or if you’re thinking about attending for the first time, here are a few things we’re excited about and hope you will be, too.

Judy Heumann Keynote: Friday, November 19, 12:30 p.m. ET
OCALICONLINE 2021 will feature Judith (Judy) Heumann, a lifelong advocate for the rights of disabled people. She contracted polio in 1949 in Brooklyn, New York and began to use a wheelchair for her mobility. She is now an internationally recognized leader in the disability rights community, and featured in the Oscar-nominated Netflix documentary, Crip Campreleased in 2020.

Dynamic presenters and presenters, and diverse content
With 300+ presenters and partners from around the world, our learning sessions highlight content for every age, and every milestone across the lifespan. From early childhood to school-age to adulthood, our sessions feature the best-of-the-best in their areas of expertise to share research, best practices, and resources that support the lifelong needs of individuals with disabilities and those who live with, love, and support them. Check out this teaser video of some of our presenters.

Special events within OCALICONLINE
Interested in learning more about inclusive leadership, or assistive technology and how it can be leveraged for individuals with developmental disabilities or with visual impairments? OCALICONLINE 2021 features a line-up of special events focused on these very topics. With experts from around the world, these sessions will provide you with practical resources and tips for taking your understanding of assistive technology to the next level.

Tuesday, November 16: Inclusive Education Leadership: Bring a team to this extended session on inclusive leadership! Hear from Ohio Department of Education leaders from the Office for Exceptional Children about special education and gifted education updates, key focus areas of supports, and project updates related to Each Child Means Each Child.

Tuesday, November 16: The BEST AT Forum is an opportunity to learn about cross-curricular braille literacy and assistive technologies for students who are blind or visually impaired. Sessions include a wide range of topics, such as learning braille with LEGO Braille Bricks, accessible astronomy, the expanded core curriculum, and much more!

Wednesday, November 17: AT for Individuals with Developmental Disabilities: Join us for a full day focused on assistive technology supports for individuals with developmental disabilities. Sessions range from advocacy and AAC assessment to smart home adaptations and AT solutions in minutes!

These are not stand-alone events, but are integrated into the conference itself. Attendees wishing to attend these sessions must register for the entire conference.

Celebrating moments of impact over 15 years
Over the past 15 years, we have seen, heard, and witnessed countless moments of impact. These stories are living examples of how those seemingly small moments of inspiration are transformed into action. These stories are of ordinary, every-day teachers, parents, and service providers whose lives were changed because of what they experienced at OCALICON. They’re people just like you. And these are their moments of impact, when inspiration transformed into action. Hear from past participants as they share their special moments of impact

Creative and fun ways to network and connect virtually
Looking for ways to take a quick break or unwind for a bit? Check out the OCALICON Channel. It’s where you can hear updates and announcements from our hosts. It’s where you can catch episodes of Slow TV. The channel will stream continuously during conference hours. And new for this year, are our OCALICONLINE hosts, the Good Life Ambassadors (GLAs). GLAs are dedicated to educating and inspiring the local community on an assortment of topics that promote inclusion and the full participation of people with disabilities in community life. You’ll also have the chance to speak directly with OCALI staff and other attendees. This is your chance to have conversations, exchange ideas, and connect with innovators and practitioners.

There’s still time to register
If you’re not registered, what are you waiting for? Don’t miss the opportunity to attend the premier autism and disabilities conference where thousands of people from around the world come together to learn, network, and share research, best practices, and resources to support the life-long needs of individuals with disabilities, including autism spectrum disorder and sensory and low-incidence disabilities. Register now!

October National Disability Employment Awareness Month - Person in wheelchair and business person standing, shaking hands
October is National Disability Employment Awareness Month

Celebrating the Capabilities of People With Disabilities to the American Workforce

October is National Disability Employment Awareness Month (NDEAM), and this year’s theme is America’s Recovery: Powered by Inclusion. According to the U.S. Department of Labor’s Office of Disability Employment Policy, this theme “reflects the importance of ensuring that people with disabilities have full access to employment and community involvement during the national recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic.”

Each October, NDEAM is designed to recognize and celebrate the contributions and capabilities of people with disabilities to the American workforce.

At OCALI, the Lifespan Transitions Center is proud of its long-standing partnership with Employment First. Employment First is a policy to ensure every individual of working age has an opportunity to seek employment. Agencies are directed to provide a person-centered planning process for every individual of working age to identify their desired employment goal and their place on the path to community employment.

“The foundational elements of Employment First’s framework—agency-neutral, outcome-focused, and person-centered—are directly aligned with our Center’s work and mission,” shares Alex Corwin, Secondary Transition and Workforce Manager, at the Lifespan Transitions Center at OCALI. “Our Center partners with all of the Employment First Taskforce member organizations to support successful systems that incorporate community life and employment.”

When supporting communities, there are many questions for those seeking employment and those who support individuals seeking employment. In celebration of National Disability Employment Awareness Month, the Center proudly shares the following free resources organized around some of the most common employment-related questions.

How prepared am I for employment?
Assessing a person’s preparedness is one of the first steps toward seeking employment. The Employment Life Skills Assessment (ELSA) is a free, informal assessment that families and professionals can use to gather information about their family member’s abilities with employability and compare against the employment standards expected of adults. This assessment can help start the conversation for preparing someone to enter or reenter the workforce. Check out the professional version or the family version of the assessment.

I’m ready to start looking for employment. How do I get started?
If you’re seeking information on the path to community employment and how to start looking for a job, the Community Life Guide, which includes two important areas of information and training. The first is community health and safety training, and the second is the Job Seekers Guide, which focuses on job seeking training and community employment. It provides step-by-step instructions and resources on how to get on the path to community employment and find a job that you enjoy.

What happens to my social security, Medicaid, and other benefits when I start working?
If you’re looking for information and resources to help analyze the impact of employment on an individual’s benefits, The Disability Benefits 101 (DB 101) is an integrated suite of online tools, information, and training where people with disabilities can directly access plain-language information about work and benefits and health coverage programs. Three calculators have been developed, including: Work and Benefits, School To Work; and Medicaid Buy-In. This suite of resources is designed for families, job seekers, and professionals and can be used to help analyze the impact of employment on an individual’s benefits. While DB 101 does not replace a comprehensive benefits analysis, it can help to provide a general understanding about employment and benefits.

How do I support a person with a disability with learning new tasks on the job?
As teams prepare youth for the transition to adulthood, developing skills for employment becomes a priority. To teach these skills educators, job coaches and others need effective tools. What Works for Work, is a free, 12-session online resource that uses evidence-based practices on how to support people with disabilities.

Throughout the month and beyond, we encourage you to explore these free resources. By sharing them, you may help others understand how they can better promote access in their schools, workplaces, and communities. For additional resources from the U.S. Department of Labor’s Office of Disability Employment Policy, visit their website.

What’s New at OCALI

Yes We Can! Journey Towards Independence - Photo of Michelle and Michelle hugging her dog
Ensuring Access to the General Curriculum for ALL Learners

Yes We Can: Journey Towards Independence
A New, Interactive Video Series: October 27, December 15, January 26, 4 p.m.
Join Michelle and her guide dog, Tonne, for a new, interactive video series designed to share how she lives an independent, quality life as a person who is DeafBlind. Each 30-minute episode will include pre-recorded segments, followed by a live dialogue with Michelle, who is eager to share her experiences and connect with viewers. Tying all of these episodes together is the connection to the Expanded Core Curriculum (ECC), which includes foundational skills essential for people with disabilities. The sessions are free, but registration is required. Certificates of completion are available for the series. Join us for one or all episodes.

Virtual Education Identification of Students with ASD
Virtual Educational Identification of Students with ASD Virtual Training Series

Register by October 25: 2021-22 Educational Identification of Students with ASD Virtual Training Series
The process to identify and serve students with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) requires a well-trained and experienced evaluation team. From creating your team to administering quality assessments to accurately interpreting findings and communicating with parents and families, it is critical to have the knowledge and skills to best support students with ASD. OCALI is pleased to host the Educational Identification of Students with ASD Training Series for the 2021-2022 school year. This introductory training series, with 10 two-hour sessions, is designed for school-based evaluation teams that want to learn about the process for educational identification of students with ASD.

The Ohio UDL Collaborative PLC
https://www.smore.com/v4myqhttps://www.smore.com/v4myqThe Ohio UDL Collaborative PLC

November 2: Ohio UDL Collaborative Monthly PLC
The members of the Ohio UDL Collaborative invite you to their monthly, virtual PLC. Join others from Ohio who are implementing UDL and find growth in the conversations to support your UDL journey. This session will focus on variability, mindset, and equity.

Ensuring Access to the General Education Curriculum for All Learners
Nov. 11, 2021 4pm EDT Ensuring Access to the General Curriculum for All Learners

November 11: InspirED: Ensuring Access to the General Curriculum for All Learners
Effectively designing instruction and assessment in a way that provides universal access across courses, lessons, and learning activities is essential for ALL students. Learn more about the strategies, research, and support resources to effectively design instruction and assessment in a way that provides universal access across courses, lessons, and learning activities. Created for educators, by educators Ensuring Access to the General Curriculum for All Learners is a new, FREE video-based learning series designed to ensure ALL learners have access to the general curriculum. 

OCALI NOW | Issue 29 • June 2021

Inspiring Change Podcast Series

The Ongoing Work of Building a Diverse and Inclusive Society 

“When I was 12, I didn’t know about disability. I didn’t know how to play with a boy, like my son,” shares Sheila Graschhinsky in the most recent Inspiring Change podcast episode. Sheila is the mother of four boys and founder and president of Fundación IAN, an organization in Buenos Aires focused on promoting a diverse and inclusive society.  

Sheila’s son, Ian, was born in 2007, and due to a lack of oxygen, he has a motor disability, which impairs him to move, talk, and coordinate some movements. Ian turns 14 this year, and it’s been a long path for the family.  

“Being the mother of a child with a disability, there are a lot of things to learn about,” she explains. “I had to learn about medicine, a lot about laws, and when talking about Ian and all his treatment, I also say that it’s as if I run a small business at home. He has more than seven therapies that I have to coordinate and all the treatments and so forth.” 

From the beginning, the family had to work on not only inclusion, but how to manage their anger when not being included or accepted. Ultimately, the family had to decide to turn their anger into action. 

What does inclusion mean, and how does it happen? 

For Sheila, the answer to both of these questions came through a literal story called, The Gift, inspired by Ian. 

“I remember taking Ian to the rehabilitation center, and in front of that center, there was a school, and I could hear some children laughing at Ian’s disability. After several similar experiences, I crossed the street and knocked on the door of the school. I was very angry and I wanted to speak with the principal. In my head, I remember I had many ideas and insults and not happy things. As I waited for the principal to come, I think that was a transforming moment for me.” 

“As I sat there, I asked myself, what was the difference between those boys at the school and my own knowledge about disability when I was 11 or 12 years? The truth is that there was no difference. When I was 12, I didn’t know about disability and I didn’t know how to play with a boy like my son. I realized that getting angry at the children who were laughing would be no answer to the situation. So I said to Ian, ‘what do you think if we write a book to show those children that you are also a child who has rights, who wants to play, and who can do many things if they help you.’ That’s how the book, The Gift, came about.”  

For an entire year, Sheila took the book with her everywhere, and if she encountered a situation with children who would laugh at Ian or would leave him out, instead of getting angry, she would give the child a book. That’s when they started to see a change.  

“After a child would read the book, the child would get closer to Ian and say hello or ask if he wanted to play. It was very inspiring for us and showed us a path, not only that we had to work with inclusion, not only that we had to manage the anger, but also to be active to get society involved. That’s how we turned our anger into action.” 

Sheila also collaborated with Mundoloco CGI to produce the short animated filmIan, which is based on a real life experience involving Sheila and Ian. The film addresses discrimination and bullying and helps all of us understand why inclusion and diversity are so critically important to our society. 

“We are all made of little pieces of our own experience, of our own lives’ experiences. And when inclusion occurs, when inclusion happens, these pieces mix up together, and you can get some other pieces of a classmate, and you grow as a person, and society grows when including.” 

 
How are YOU building inclusion in your own community? OCALI wants to know! We’re looking for interesting and innovative stories to highlight in future issues of OCALI NowShare my inclusion story

InspirED Logo with screenshot of three presenters from the episode Honoring Families Through the Lens of UDL
InspirED Episode: Honoring Families Through the Lens of Universal Design for Learning

Honoring Families Through the Lens of Universal Design for Learning 

Family involvement is something we all want. However, how do we make it happen? Furthermore, how do we move from engaging families to empowering them, especially during unprecedented times when the connection between homes and schools must be even stronger? 

To build effective programming, we must begin by ensuring that we honor our families and include them as partners for the education of all our learners. Our recent InspirED virtual learning session (from June 16) explores how Universal Design for Learning (UDL) can boost connections and engagement to meet the varying needs of families. The session also highlights these connections with Ohio’s strategic plan, Each Child, Our Future

Hear from Andratesha Fritzgerald, Director of Human Resources, East Cleveland Schools and Founder, Building Blocks of Brilliance, LLC; Jen Bavry, Program Director, Family and Community Outreach Center at OCALI; and Ron Rogers, Program Director, Universal Design for Learning (UDL) Center at OCALI as they share more in this 30-minute session. 

How can we improve this newsletter? Sad face, neutral face, happy face with a rating scale from so-so to good to perfect
Take the survey to tell us what you think of OCALI NOW

Tell Us What You Think 

OCALI is committed to inspiring change and promoting access for people with disabilities and those who live with, love, and support them. 

To gauge our effectiveness and obtain your feedback related to our OCALI Now newsletter, we ask that you complete a brief survey. Your input is important and will help us continuously improve our communications with you.  Please complete this brief survey by July 9, 2021.

Computer screen with text: We Are Hiring and OCALI logo
We are Hiring

OCALI is Hiring 

At OCALI, inspiring change and promoting access for people with disabilities is at the heart of everything we do. We believe that all people with disabilities deserve to have the opportunity to live their best lives for their whole lives — at school, home, work, and in the community. If you share our passion, and want to work with a team of committed and compassionate colleagues, check our newest employment opportunities. We are hiring an Early Childhood Specialist and a Transition to Adulthood Consultant.

Challenging Behavior: Expect Success webinar series

Addressing Challenging Behavior Webinar Series 

Every person is unique and has different strengths, talents, and skills. When addressing challenging behaviors for people with complex needs, it is essential to individualize the process in order to develop effective intervention plans. This 14-part webinar series is based in positive behavior intervention supports (PBIS), functional behavior assessment (FBA), and behavior intervention planning. The series explores the belief system and a systematic process essential to understanding and addressing challenging behavior. It also includes team-based strategies that focus on matching evidence-based interventions to a target behavior, after in-depth exploration of the individual’s strengths and challenges. This series is ideal for anyone supporting school-age children, adolescents, and adults. Inclusive of the components of PBIS, this training can support educational teams working with students in need of Tier 3 support. 

Unlocking the English Code webinar series

Unlocking the English Code: Literacy for Learners Who are Deaf/Hard of Hearing or Blind/Visually Impaired 

Nationally, prioritizing language and literacy development for all learners has been a focus for many educators. This focus requires that educators build their capacity to support evidence-based language and literacy instruction, particularly for educators supporting deaf/hard of hearing (D/HH) or blind/visually impaired (B/VI) learners, who access English and print in different ways. To help those who are assessing and teaching literacy for these learners, the Outreach Center for Deafness and Blindness at OCALI is pleased to offer the recording of our professional learning event designed to explore and connect the areas of phonological awareness, phonics, writing, fluency, vocabulary, communication, language, and comprehension specifically for learners who are D/HH or B/VI. Certificates of completion are available and provided on completion of the recording and accompanying survey. 

Effectively Assessing Learners via Telepsychology webinar series

Administering Telepsychological Assessments 

The transition to remote learning left instructional leaders and educators little to no time to prepare and transition how they deliver instruction. Meeting and assessing the needs of all learners in this online environment has been challenging, particularly for students who are deaf, hard of hearing, blind, or visually impaired. To help school psychologists and district and building leaders build comfort and confidence in virtually assessing all learners, particularly those who are deaf/hard of hearing (D/HH) or blind/visually impaired (B/VI), OCALI launched a free webinar series, Building Capacity to Serve All Learners: Effectively Assessing Learners via Telepsychology. Parts I and II of the series explored preparing for and completing telepsychology assessments with learners who are D/HH or B/VI. Expanding off of Parts I and II, Part III is designed to focus on the practical demonstration of specific aspects of telepsychological assessments, including how to administer a standard test battery to learners who are D/HH or B/VI. Check out the recordings. 

InspirED Video Gallery logo with hands touching laptop computer
InspirED Video Gallery now available

InspirED Virtual Learning Series 

The InspirED Video Gallery has recently been reorganized by audience – for families and professionals – and by topic, including: accessibility, autism, early childhood, family and community, PBIS, remote learning, transition, universal design for learning, wellbeing and self-care, along with assessment and data for professionals. As always, all sessions include interactive transcripts, audio description, and supporting materials, and the opportunity to earn a professional development certificate by completing a survey at the end of each session. A great way to get FREE professional development hours.  

Last fall, OCALI, in partnership with the Ohio Department of Education’s Office for Exceptional Children, launched the InspirED Virtual Learning Series. The free learning series consists of 30-minute recorded, facilitated sessions focused on increasing successful engagement of diverse learners in a remote/virtual instructional environment, linking the users with appropriate resources and tools. The InspirED Video Gallery has recently been reorganized by audience – for families and professionals – and by topic, including: accessibility, autism, early childhood, family and community, PBIS, remote learning, transition, universal design for learning, wellbeing and self-care, along with assessment and data for professionals. As always, all sessions include interactive transcripts, audio description, and supporting materials, and the opportunity to earn a professional development certificate by completing a survey at the end of each session. It’s a great way to get FREE professional development hours.

Group of four young people watching sunset over a cityscape
The Journey: A free webinar series

The Journey: Webinar Series Video Gallery 

The Transition from School to Adult Life is an ongoing journey. Youth with complex and unique needs often require teams to have access to a variety of tools, resources, and people to plan and prepare for the future. These webinars are designed for teams assisting youth with complex support needs and their families to better navigate the process of the own journey to adulthood. 

OCALI NOW | Issue 28 • May 2021

OCALICONLINE 2021 15 year anniversary logo
OCALICONLINE 15 year anniversary

Celebrating 15 Years of Inspiration Into Action

OCALICONLINE Returns This November

Inspiration can come in many forms. A conversation, a connection, a bit of information that sparks a new perspective. Sometimes it happens gradually, and sometimes it happens in an instant. Inspiration opens the door to imagine new possibilities. And action breathes life into those possibilities that can bring about real change.

As the premier autism and disabilities conference, OCALICONLINE reaches across disciplines, age groups, and audiences to impact people’s lives for their entire lives. Along with our partners, we bring you world-class speakers and sessions with a variety of experiences and perspectives, so there’s something for everyone. 

Reflections Over the Past 15 Years

OCALICONLINE 2021 marks the second year of hosting the event exclusively online, but the 15th year of providing participants with ample opportunities to transform inspiration into action. As we reflect on the last 15 years, we take stock of not only how far we have come within the field of disabilities and as a conference, but as a society. Much has changed. We look back on the last 15 years knowing we have come a long way, but we look ahead to the next 15 years knowing there is still much work to do.

Everett Bradley is one such person who has seen that change over the last 15 years, ultimately experiencing on a very personal level what it looks like to turn inspiration into action. Bradley joined the conference team for the inaugural conference in 2007, to oversee the numerous volunteers needed to stage the event. His business background enabled him to efficiently streamline and coordinate the volunteers, and his role was largely behind-the-scenes. It wasn’t until his youngest daughter was diagnosed with autism that his trajectory changed. He was no longer just the volunteer coordinator. He was now a beneficiary of the ideas, strategies, and expertise offered through OCALICON.

“The knowledge I learned from OCALICON gave me the courage and strength to start asking questions,” Bradley shares. “Personally, there is no doubt that the conference was the catalyst for my family into understanding my daughter.”

“Everett has been an essential team member from that very first conference in 2007,” says Simon Buehrer, one of the conference coordinators. “We’re thrilled and humbled to hear his personal story of how discoveries and connections he made through OCALICON had a direct impact on his family.”

“That’s exactly why we do this.”

“OCALICON focuses on supporting needs across the lifespan,” says Jill Hudson, another one of the conference coordinators. “So, we hope Everett and his family will continue to benefit from OCALICON as his daughter grows through the schooling years and into adulthood.”

“It’s been such an honor and privilege to be part of this community of professionals, parents, and self-advocates and see it grow and evolve over the last 15 years. It’s important to celebrate all their achievements and accomplishments in 2021 – and even more exciting to think about all the opportunities that are in progress and the possibilities on the horizon.”

New for 2021

The planning team is always looking for fresh new content, ideas, and presenters to keep attendees engaged and inspired. This year, the event will include several new features, including:

  • Expanding the event from three days to four, allowing time for additional content and a modified structure with more breaks between sessions.
  • Hosting an Artist Spotlight, showcasing the talents and skills of people on the spectrum or with a disability—from artists to musicians, filmmakers to poets.
  • Inviting community members from around the state to serve as hosts and emcees.
  • Offering one single closing keynote instead of a keynote every day.

Introducing Our Keynote

Judy Heumann keynote for OCALICONLINE 2021
Judy Heumann

OCALICONLINE 2021 will feature Judy Heumann, a lifelong advocate for the rights of disabled people. She contracted polio in 1949 and began to use a wheelchair for mobility. She is an internationally recognized leader in the disability rights community, and featured in the Oscar-nominated Netflix documentary Crip Camp, released in 2020.

“Judy has been leading the charge for disability rights for decades, and it’s an honor to host her,” shared Courtney Yantes, event specialist. “She holds a perspective of not only someone who has been down in the trenches doing the hard work of advocacy and fighting for disability rights, but she’s also been flying up at the highest levels of the government, seeing a much larger picture than most of us will ever see.”  

Join Us November 16-19

For some of you, OCALICONLINE 2021 may be a starting point. Your young child is newly diagnosed, and you’re looking for answers and connections. For others, OCALICONLINE 2021 is a continuation of years spent investing in and raising up a new generation of students. Or you may be a self-advocate celebrating your yearly reunion with peers and colleagues. Whether it’s your first time at OCALICON, or you’ve been with us for all 15 years, each of us has an important role to play in this experience. The knowledge we share and connections we make when we come together as a community, empower each of us to move Inspiration into Action.

Don’t miss OCALICONLINE 2021 November 16-19. Join us online. We’re saving you a front-row seat.

Supporting your personal and professional learning this summer

Supporting Your Personal and Professional Learning This Summer

The 2020-2021 school year has been unlike anything we have ever experienced—transitioning from virtual to hybrid to in-person learning models, managing stints of quarantine, and in many cases, trying to figure out how to meet students and individuals where they were at any given time. It was a year that tested us and pushed us in new and different ways, and yet it was a year that also inspired us to be more flexible, innovative, and creative.

As many educators and parents prepare take a ‘pause’ from the school year—taking a mental health break, planning the long-awaited vacation, or just getting ready to enjoy a more relaxed schedule, we want to remind you that we are here to support your professional and personal learning and have a variety of resources available—many of which are free and several that offer the opportunity to earn graduate or continuing education credit. You can access these resources any time, in your own home, and at your own pace.

For people with disabilities and those supporting them—families, educators, caregivers, service providers, and others—it is essential to have the latest knowledge, skills, resources, and tools to ensure they can live their best lives for their whole lives. For more than 15 years, OCALI has been a trusted source of providing high quality research, resources, and training.

As you consider your professional learning plans—for yourself or your teams—OCALI has compiled some resources to get you started.

InspirED Virtual Learning Series

Last fall, OCALI, in partnership with the Ohio Department of Education’s Office for Exceptional Children, launched the InspirED Virtual Learning Series. The free learning series consists of 30-minute recorded, facilitated sessions focused on increasing successful engagement of diverse learners in a remote/virtual instructional environment, linking the users with appropriate resources and tools. The InspirED Video Gallery has recently been reorganized by audience – for families and professionals – and by topic, including: accessibility, autism, early childhood, family and community, PBIS, remote learning, transition, universal design for learning, wellbeing and self-care, along with assessment and data for professionals. As always, all sessions include interactive transcripts, audio description, and supporting materials, and the opportunity to earn a professional development certificate by completing a survey at the end of each session. It’s a great way to get FREE professional development hours.

Ask Abbey: Developing Literacy Skills for Learners Who are Deaf/Hard of Hearing Gallery

This interactive learning series is designed to provide practical, easy-to-use strategies to increase auditory skills, visual language skills, and reading and writing print for learners who are deaf or hard of hearing. Each 30-minute session includes a 10-minute webinar with simple tips and strategies, followed by 20 minutes of Q&A with Abbey Weaver, an itinerant teacher for the deaf and hard of hearing in Ohio. Certificates of completion for the 30 minute sessions are available and provided on completion of the webinar and accompanying survey.

Addressing Challenging Behavior Webinar Series

Every person is unique and has different strengths, talents, and skills. When addressing challenging behaviors for people with complex needs, it is essential to individualize the process in order to develop effective intervention plans. This 14-part webinar series is based in positive behavior intervention supports (PBIS), functional behavior assessment (FBA), and behavior intervention planning. The series explores the belief system and a systematic process essential to understanding and addressing challenging behavior. It also includes team-based strategies that focus on matching evidence-based interventions to a target behavior, after in-depth exploration of the individual’s strengths and challenges. This series is ideal for anyone supporting school-age children, adolescents, and adults. Inclusive of the components of PBIS, this training can support educational teams working with students in need of Tier 3 support.

Assistive Technology Internet Modules (ATIM)

ATIM is designed to provide high-quality information and professional development on assistive technology (AT) for educators, professionals, families, persons with disabilities, and others. Each module guides you through case studies, instructional videos, pre- and post-assessments, a glossary, and much more. ATIM modules are available at no cost. Fee-based professional development certificates and graduate credit hours are available and continuing education credits are coming soon.

Suite of Resources for Early Childhood Professionals

If you’re an early childhood professional who needs hours toward your credential, or you want to build your knowledge about early childhood topics, the Center for the Young Child’s Suite of Resources is a great place to start. These modules have received the Ohio Approved (OA) designation and are also eligible for Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities continuing professional development (CPD) unit in the area of developmental specialist/supervisor, EI service coordinator/supervisor.  If you’re a developmental specialist who needs hours toward your credential or you are an early care or education professional who wants to build their knowledge around child growth and development, check out the Early Care and Education Seminars.

The Journey: Webinar Series Video Gallery

The transition from school to adult life is an ongoing journey. Youth with complex and unique needs often require teams to have access to a variety of tools, resources, and people to plan and prepare for the future. These webinars are designed for teams assisting youth with complex support needs and their families to better navigate the process of the own journey to adulthood. If you missed a session or want to go back and re-watch, check out the video gallery. This gallery is also a great resource to share with colleagues and others who may benefit from the information.

10 Minutes with Barb and Ron and #UDLChat

Join Barb and Ron for 10 minutes of light and fun chats infused with a perspective on Universal Design for Learning (UDL). These videos are geared toward parents, educators, college students, and administrators. Also check out the #UDLchat, which occurs every 1st and 3rd Wednesday at 9 p.m. Eastern on Twitter.

From My Perspective

Created by OCALI’s Family and Community Outreach Center, From My Perspective is a podcast featuring people with disabilities, their families, friends, and others in their lives sharing about everyday life, their interests, opinions, and more. Check out the latest episodes on belonging or check out other past episodes.

OCALI’s Lending Library & Know More Do More Campaign Resources

During the month of April, OCALI shared information and resources from our Lending Library by launching the #KnowMoreDoMore campaign. These resources featured different topics, including social-emotional wellbeing, supporting family interactions, early childhood, supporting independence in adolescence and adulthood, and more. The OCALI Lending Library is a great resource to connect you with accessible materials, resources, and technology. We offer Ohioans an extensive collection of FREE books, videos, assistive technology devices, assessment tools, and other resources that are available to borrow and shipped directly at no charge.

OCALI NOW | Issue 27 • April 2021

Autism Acceptance Month. #KnowMoreDoMore. April 2021. OCALI logo across the bottom with colorful border of circles.

Shifting from Autism Awareness to Autism Acceptance

Since 2008, April has been recognized as Autism Awareness Month in Ohio. The intent was designed to bring awareness to autism and to encourage and empower individuals with autism in Ohio and their families.

Earlier this month, Governor DeWine signed a proclamation to recognize April as Autism Acceptance Month, which states, “the purpose of Autism Acceptance Month in Ohio is to spread awareness, foster acceptance, and identify the public policy improvements needed for people with autism to live fully across all areas of life.”

The transition from the word awareness to acceptance may not seem like a big deal. But, words matter and the shift to acceptance accounts for accommodating the feelings of others and accepting and celebrating our differences. Acceptance requires taking conscious action and shifting from not only seeing and recognizing that autism exists, but seeking to listen and learn, and then adapting our perspectives and behaviors. Just being aware of autism facts and information will not necessarily lead to acceptance or create inclusive and supportive environments in our schools, communities, and relationships. However, by intentionally moving toward acceptance, we can inspire confidence and a vision for possibilities that motivate us to continue to ensure that people with disabilities can live their best lives for their whole lives.

Acceptance is also the first step toward inclusion. Inclusion then leads to belonging, which is essential to truly connecting and relating to others. Unfortunately, acceptance and belonging are often the biggest barriers to inclusion that people with autism and their families encounter. At OCALI, our mission is to inspire change and promote access to opportunities for people with disabilities. Over the years, we have been working hard to break down traditional barriers for people with autism and other disabilities and explore things that others may not have yet seen as possible. While we have made significant progress, we have more work to do and we continue to explore and learn new ways of listening, understanding, and modeling. Our words and work must then translate into action.

The good news is that we don’t have to do this alone. As leaders and practitioners, autistic and disabled people, parents, family members, neighbors, and community members, we ALL play a role in inspiring the change we wish to see. 

Throughout the month of April, we encourage you to seek out opportunities that promote acceptance—for yourself and within your own communities. Following are a few simple ideas to get started:

Learn more. Explore information and resources about autism. A few websites to check out:

The Autism Center at OCALI
The Autism Society of Ohio
Interagency Work Group on Autism

Show support. Many organizations are hosting Autism Acceptance Month social media campaigns. You can easily show your support by reviewing and sharing the information and using designated social media tags. This month, OCALI is using the hashtag #KnowMoreDoMore, as part of a month-long email and social media campaign featuring information and resources from our Lending Library. Each week, we are featuring information and resources suggested by the Autism Center, Family and Community Outreach Center, Center for the Young Child, and Lifespan Transitions Center on various topics, including social-emotional wellbeing, early-childhood, supporting family interactions, and independence

Connect with others. Acceptance is an ‘everyone’ conversation and we all have the power and ability to support acceptance. Simply showing that you’re genuinely open and interested in learning more about autism, particularly from autistic people or their family members goes a long way.

Now, more than ever, it is important to recognize the unique strengths, challenges, and experiences of each person with autism and their families. Rather than attempting to paint with a broad brush based on a shared label or diagnosis, instead we encourage everyone to thoughtfully engage and inspire. Have meaningful conversations about what is most supportive for each person, in each setting in that moment, and then do those things! It’s much easier to write it down than to actually do the work—especially when someone’s experiences don’t match your own. But, by working together to create truly accessible spaces and ensuring that everyone is supported, accepted, and included, that’s what inspiring change is about. 

Rewind OCALICON podcast series with an image of a microphone

The Smell of the Room is a Fire in My Nose:
A Conversation on Autism and Trauma

Trauma by its very nature is an incredibly personal and individual experience. There are many different forms of trauma and many different ways it can impact, shape, and define who we are and who we become. But, what about people on the autism spectrum—autistic people. What’s different about how they experience, deal with, and live with trauma?

These are the questions that Kim Clary and Kelly Mahler explore in Rewind, a new series within the Inspiring Change podcast that features conversations and connections from OCALICON—OCALI’s premier autism and disabilities conference. Rewind is the audio showcase of some of OCALICON’s best moments, the speakers’ sessions, and the stories that make it all happen.

Kim Clary is an occupational therapist in Bellaire, Florida and Kelly Mahler is an occupational therapist in Hershey, Pennsylvania. Kelly and Kim push us to expand our thinking beyond what we might consider to be traditional causes of trauma in a conversation about how people with autism experience different types of trauma in different ways, and in ways that ask us to think differently about what trauma is and the impact it can have. Kim further illustrates the effects of trauma by sharing some of her poems and journal entries.

Imagine that you are in the midst of a hurricane outside without protection. That you cannot seek shelter. Imagine that you are in a burning building and cannot leave. Or that your body is covered in angry fire ants. Imagine that you are suddenly attacked, suddenly blinded by sharp daggers in your eyes. Imagine this – is your life. You can imagine it, but I don’t have to. These things are my life.

“What we know about trauma is that it is a response to an event or a series of events that make someone feel unsafe, threatened, or severely distressed and trauma impacts your neurology—both your brain and your body,” explains Kelly. “Trauma also impacts your physiology. It’s important to point out that trauma is dependent on how a person experiences an event.”

“I think that it just goes to show that we really need to be good detectives and always think through a trauma-informed and an autism-informed lens and really figure out what’s going on with each individual person,” continues Kelly. “I think our main goal – besides offering hope and strategies of how to support – is to challenge the way that we’re viewing trauma in the autism field.”

What’s New at OCALI

Ask Abbey: Engaging Learners Who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing Through Music, Art, and Gym. A free interactive, three-part learning series. Picture of Abbey Weaver in upper right corner.

Register for the last session on April 28! This interactive, three-part learning series is designed to provide practical, easy-to-use strategies on how to include learners who are deaf or hard of hearing in gym, art, and music classes. Each session will incorporate considerations to ensure each learner is safe, engaged, and challenged. Each 30-minute session will include a 10-minute webinar with simple tips and strategies, followed by 20 minutes of live Q&A with Abbey Weaver, an itinerant teacher for the deaf and hard of hearing in Ohio. The sessions are free, but registration is required. Certificates of completion are available for the series. Join us for the last session.

Unlocking the English Code: Literacy for Learners Who are Deaf/Hard of Hearing or Blind/Visually Impaired. A free webinar May 14, 2021 from 11am-3pm. Register now. Image of teachers and students working together.

Nationally, prioritizing language and literacy development for all learners has been a focus for many educators. This focus requires that we build educators’ capacity to support evidence-based language and literacy instruction, particularly for educators supporting learners who are deaf/hard of hearing (D/HH) or blind/visually impaired (B/VI), who access English and print in different ways.

To help those who are assessing and teaching literacy to these learners, the Outreach Center for Deafness and Blindness at OCALI is pleased to offer this interactive, virtual professional learning event designed to explore and connect the areas of phonological awareness, phonics, writing, fluency, vocabulary, communication, language, and comprehension specifically for learners who are D/HH or B/VI. 

OCALICONLINE 2021 15 years logo Registration Opens May 3 Celebrating 15 years of inspiration into action November 16-19

Inspiration can come in many forms. A conversation, a connection, a bit of information that sparks a new perspective. Sometimes it happens gradually, and sometimes it happens in an instant. Inspiration opens the door to imagine new possibilities. And action breathes life into those possibilities that can bring about real change.

OCALICONLINE 2021 marks the second year of hosting the event exclusively online, but the 15th year of providing participants with ample opportunities to transform inspiration into action. As we reflect on the last 15 years, we take stock of not only how far we have come within the field of disabilities and as a conference, but as a society. Much has changed. Some for the better, some not for the better. We look back on the last 15 years knowing we have come a long way, but we look ahead to the next 15 years knowing there is still much work to do.

No matter where you are personally or professionally, OCALICONLINE 2021 is the place where you can gather, connect, rest, or regroup.

There’s a place for you here. And we’ve saved you a front-row seat. 

Building Capacity to Serve All Learners: Effectively Assessing Learners via Telepsychology. Part III: Administering Telepsychological Assessments. A free webinar May 20, 2021, 9-10 am. Register now.

The transition to remote learning left instructional leaders and educators little to no time to prepare and transition how they deliver instruction. Meeting and assessing the needs of all learners in this online environment has been challenging, particularly for students who are deaf, hard of hearing, blind, or visually impaired.

To help school psychologists and district and building leaders build comfort and confidence in virtually assessing all learners, particularly those who are deaf/hard of hearing (D/HH) or blind/visually impaired (B/VI), OCALI launched a free webinar series, Building Capacity to Serve All Learners: Effectively Assessing Learners via Telepsychology.

Part III: Administering Telepsychological Assessments
Parts I and II of the series explored preparing for and completing telepsychological assessments with learners who are D/HH or B/VI. Expanding off of Parts I and II, Part III is designed to focus on the practical demonstration of specific aspects of telepsychological assessments, including how to administer a standard test battery to learners who are D/HH or B/VI.

Explore, rewatch and share past sessions in the InspirED Video gallery, photos of young adults using computers

Did you miss an InspirED learning session or want to go back re-watch or check out other sessions? Explore the InspirED Video Gallery. Here, learners can access all previously aired sessions, which include interactive transcripts, audio description, and session materials. This gallery is also a great resource to share with colleagues and others who may benefit from the information.

Don’t forget learners have the opportunity to earn a professional development certificate by completing a survey at the end of each session. Did we mention that this is a FREE way to get professional development hours?

The Journey: A Free Webinar Series. Lifespan Transitions Center logo in lower left corner. Image of four young people overlooking sunset from top of building.

To support County Boards of Developmental Disabilities in helping youth with complex needs and their families navigate the journey to from school to adult life, the Lifespan Transitions Center at OCALI has created a free webinar series, called The Journey, designed to explore important topics and feature resources and tools for transition assessment and planning, as well as student instruction and family engagement. Register for the upcoming May webinar:

What I Wish I Knew Then: Parents’ Perspectives Following High School
Monday, May 17, 2:30–3:00 PM
Parents of young adults with complex support needs offer insights and considerations after experiencing life after high school. This panel discussion is an authentic dialogue that provides educators, SSAs, OOD counselors, families, and others awareness about what was most helpful during the school years and what else might have been helpful in order to prepare for the future. 

Visit the archive of previously aired webinars and register for upcoming sessions.

OCALI Now | Issue 21 | September 2020

September is National Deaf Awareness Month

Banner image that reads September is National Deaf Awareness Month
September is National Deaf Awareness Month

At OCALI, we are grateful to be part of a community of people who are just as committed to inspiring change and promoting access for people with disabilities as we are. It’s what fuels our team and the work that we do every day.

As we celebrate Deaf Awareness Month in September, the Outreach Center for Deafness and Blindness at OCALI is proud to share several free resources, including:

Throughout September, we encourage you to explore these free resources. By sharing them, you may help others understand how they can better promote access in their schools, workplaces, and communities.

To learn more about the Outreach Center, visit https://deafandblindoutreach.org or on Facebook, Twitter, or Instagram.

Banner image that reads Did You Know...
Did you know…
  • There are over 300 signed languages? September 23 is International Day of Sign Languages. Celebrate by learning to sign your name in American Sign Language.
  • High-quality captioning provides access and information to over 30 million people who are deaf or hard of hearing, including young readers and individuals who are learning English as a second language? Be sure to use captions, and make sure they’re accurate.
  • Something as simple as taking turns can improve access? Whether you are working face-to-face or virtually, setting up rules for how and when people communicate makes things easier for everyone.

New: InspirED Virtual Learning Series

InspirED logo

As we continue to watch the COVID-19 pandemic evolve across the world, one thing we know for sure—the 2020-2021 school year will look different—for students, families, teachers, and administrators. Depending on the district, some, most, or even all instruction will be delivered online.

As an organization committed to promoting access and inspiring change for people with disabilities, OCALI and the Ohio Department of Education’s Office for Exceptional Children are partnering to support educators, education professionals, families, and others during this pandemic and in a new, remote learning environment with the creation of—InspirED Virtual Learning Series.

Our vision for this virtual learning series is to fill a need and help educators, administrators, and families find the information and resources they need to support learning and successful outcomes for their students or children during a very unique time of learning.

Initially, the learning series will consist of 15 Zoomcast sessions or recorded, facilitated conversations that are approximately 30 minutes each. Over time, additional sessions will be added to the library. All content will focus on increasing successful engagement of diverse learners in a remote/virtual instructional environment, linking users with appropriate resources and tools. Learners will have the ability to earn a professional development certificate by completing a survey at the end of each learning session.

The series will kick off with three Zoomcast sessions hosted by OCALI and Ohio Department of Education staff:

  • September 24: Accessible Educational Materials (AEM): An All-Access Pass to Success
  • September 29: Welcome to Homeroom! Tips for Creating a Learning Environment at Home
  • October 1: Supporting Positive Behavior at School and at Home: Strategies to Reduce Interfering Behaviors, Part I

What’s New at OCALI

AT Conference and Vendor Fair logo

Virtual Assistive Technology (AT) Vendor Fair: September 29

Assistive technology (AT) are tools and supports that provide access to the curriculum and aspects of everyday life for individuals with disabilities. The AT Conference and Vendor Fair’s mission is to build capacity in the regions by providing learning opportunities about the latest assistive technology to provide access to the curriculum for individuals with disabilities. Join us for a one-day virtual event where 20+ vendors will share a variety of virtual sessions showcasing state-of-the-art assistive technology and remote learning options. Experience 1:1 vendor consultations and explore from the comfort of home. Learn more and register.

OCALI and Autism Internet Modules logos
OCALI AIM Autism Internet Modules logo

New & Updated AIM Modules

New: Motor Differences in Autism Spectrum Disorder

Learn about the body systems which work together to give us motor contact and about typical motor development. This module also highlights some of the most common motor differences we see in individuals with autism.

Updated: Assessment for Identification

Quality assessment is the key to accurate diagnosis of autism spectrum disorders. Assessment is also a foundation of a strong intervention plan. This is no quality evaluation without trained and experienced team members. Learn more in this newly updated module.

The Journey: A Free Webinar Series banner

The Journey: A Free Webinar Series

To support County Boards of Developmental Disabilities in helping youth with complex needs and their families navigate the journey to and from school to adult life, the Lifespan Transitions Center at OCALI has created a free webinar series, called The Journey, designed to support topics, such as:

  • Creating structure,
  • Improving self-determination,
  • Planning for transition, and
  • Supporting literacy.

The webinars highlight different websites, videos, printable documents, and other resources. Additional webinars are planned for the following:

OCALICONLINE 2020 logo
OCALICONLINE 2020 logo

OCALICON Award Nominations Due September 30

There’s still time to submit your nominations for the Margaret Burley Family Impact and Kathe Shelby Leadership Awards! Do you know someone who has done extraordinary work to support and improve outcomes for people with autism, sensory disabilities, and/or low-incidence disabilities? Don’t let them go unnoticed! Nominations are due by September 30, and can be completed online. Learn more.

Ohio Interagency Work Group on Autism logo
Ohio Interagency Work Group on Autism logo

Webinar: Multi-system Youth with Autism — Ohio’s System Change Efforts

Friday, September 25, 2020, 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM EDT

Youth and young adults with autism frequently experience co-occurring mental and behavioral health conditions, and are increasingly served by multiple systems in Ohio. These youth are more likely to visit an emergency department for psychiatric reasons, have more outpatient and inpatient hospital visits, primary care and psychiatric visits, health care claims, and higher health care costs than youth with other disabilities, and are at greater risk of suicide.

In this month’s webinar, the Interagency Work Group on Autism (IWGA) is joined by parent, Mark Butler, and members of the DeWine administration. Panelists include:

  • LeeAnne Cornyn, Director of Children’s Initiatives, Office of the Governor
  • Sarah LaTourette, Executive Director, Ohio Family and Children First 
  • Maureen Corcoran, Director, Ohio Department of Medicaid

Join us Friday, September 25 from 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM to hear about the challenges faced by Ohio’s families and efforts to make change. Register now.

Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities Logo
Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities logo

Resources & Reminders from the Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities (DODD)

DSP Recognition Week is September 13-19. We are encouraging families to share short videos showing their appreciation for their DSPs. They can tag DODD on social media or send an email to: communications.team@dodd.ohio.gov.

Virtual Transformation Summit Day 2 is September 22. Learn more and register.

Trusting the Team Process: Throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, people with developmental disabilities and their teams have been challenged to make adjustments to the routines, services, and supports that help people live and thrive in their homes and communities. In recent weeks, those discussions have become more complex as people balance the increasing opportunities as Ohio reopens with ongoing risks of COVID-19. DODD has guidance for Trusting the Team Process in making these decisions.